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    «Посмотрим выше, прямо в космос». Фото и видео из Instagram NASA

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    В Instagram крупнейшего космического агентства NASA практически каждый день можно найти новые фотографии планет, космических объектов и разных явлений с подробным описанием того, что это вообще такое. Видео с космодромов также присутствуют.

    Fish-eye view of planet Earth. NASA astronaut Randy Bresnik (@astrokomrade) captured this timelapse video from his unique vantage point on the International Space Station (@iss), 250 miles above our home planet. He posted it to his social media accounts on Oct. 1 saying, «Desert sands, wispy clouds, and blue ocean, the cupola fish-eye spies many features along the spine of Africa in this #timelapse.» There are currently six people living and working on the space station, which is orbiting our planet at 17,500 mph. They are conducting important science and research on the orbiting laboratory that will not only help us send humans to deep space destinations, like Mars, but also has direct benefits to live here on Earth. Credit: NASA #nasa #space #spacestation #international #science #research #laboratory #microgravity #earth #africa #sand #desert #ocean #clouds #fisheye #astronaut

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    Numerous arches of magnetic field lines danced and swayed above a large active region on the Sun over about a 30-hour period on July 17-18, 2017. We can also see the magnetic field lines from the large active region reached out and connected with a smaller active region. Those linked lines then strengthened (become brighter), but soon began to develop a kink in them and rather swiftly faded from view. All of this activity is driven by strong magnetic forces associated with the active regions. The images were taken in extreme ultraviolet light. Credit: NASA #nasa #space #solar #observation #sdo #sun #solarsystem #active #loops #videooftheday #star #astronomy #science

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    One hundred years ago today, on July 17, at the dawn of humanity’s foray into to powered flight, something happened that changed forever the way humans would take to the skies. And, then the way we explore space. And, then how we study our home planet. That something was the establishment of what is now our Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. Air travel, spaceflight, robotic solar-system missions: science fiction to those alive at the turn of the 20th century became science fact to those living in the 21st. America’s aerospace future has been literally made at the Langley Research Center by the best and brightest the country has to offer. Langley broke new ground in aeronautical research with a suite of first-of-their-kind wind tunnels that led to numerous advances in commercial, military and vertical flight, such as helicopters and other rotorcraft. Airflow turning vanes are shown here in Langley’s 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. Image Credit: NASA #nasa #langley #aernautics #aerospace #solarsystem #windtunnel #langelyresearchcentercentennial #spaceflight #aerodynamics #space #NASALangley100 #NASALangley #research #history #anniversary #centennial #100years

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    Stacked “bubbles” of the so-called Honeycomb Nebula are seen here among spindly, spidery filaments of gas in the Tarantula Nebula. These bubble-like shapes are likely only seen because of the Hubble Space Telescope’s unique viewpoint. At a distance of 160,000 light-years, the Large Magellanic Cloud – which is home to these “bubbles” – is one of the Milky Way’s closest companions. It is also home to one of the largest and most intense regions of active star formation known to exist anywhere in our galactic neighborhood – the Tarantula Nebula. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgements: Judy Schmidt #nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #spacetelescope #telescope #galaxy #nebula #star #active #spidery #tarantula #bubbles #lightyears #picoftheday #solarsystem #milkyway #universe

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    Suited Up for a Day's Work: Astronaut Randy Bresnik (@AstroKomrade) is seen wearing his spacewalking suit, an Extravehicular Mobility Unit, during an October 5 spacewalk to replace a degraded robotic arm "hand," called the Latching End Effector, on the tip of the International Space Station's (@ISS) robotic arm, the Canadarm2. This was the first of three spacewalks planned for October. The second and third spacewalks will be devoted to lubricating the newly installed end effector and replacing cameras on the left side of the space station’s truss and the right side of the station’s U.S. Destiny laboratory. Image Credit: NASA #nasa #space #spacestation #international #science #spacewalk #laboratory #microgravity #spacesuit #astronaut

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    In the early morning hours of September 27, our Space Launch System (@NASA_SLS) core stage pathfinder is seen arriving by barge at our Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, LA. The SLS rocket is an advanced launch vehicle being built as humanity’s most powerful rocket ever. Within the rocket is the core stage, which will enable SLS to go beyond Earth’s orbit into deep space. The core stage pathfinder pictured here is similar in size, shape and weight to the 212-foot-tall core stage and will be used to test new shipping and handling equipment as well as procedures from the manufacturing site to the test site to the launch site. A pathfinder is built for testing to reduce the risk of damage to actual one-of-a-kind spaceflight hardware for SLS. Credit: NASA/MSFC/MAF/Steven Seipel #nasa #spacelaunchsystem #spaceexploration #exploration #sls #research #testing #solarsystemexploration #rocket

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    This time-lapse video from astronauts on the International Space Station (@ISS) shows an aurora above Canada beginning over the California coast, to North Dakota then on to Quebec when day breaks. Taken on Sept. 15, 2017, the orbiting laboratory is located 250 miles above Earth and is traveling at 17,500 miles per hour. At any given time, the station is home to more than 250 experiments, including some that are helping us determine the effects of microgravity on the human body. Research on the station will not only help us send humans deeper into space than ever before, including to Mars, but also benefits life here on Earth. Credit: NASA #nasa #space #spacestation #aurora #stars #night #glowing #astronaut #solararray #picoftheday #earth #globe #home

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    NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson, who set multiple U.S. space records during her mission aboard the International Space Station, along with crewmates Jack Fischer of NASA and Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin of Roscosmos, safely landed on Earth Saturday at 9:21 p.m. EDT (7:21 a.m. Kazakhstan time, Sept. 3), southeast of the remote town of Dzhezkazgan in Kazakhstan. While living and working aboard the world’s only orbiting laboratory, Whitson and Fischer contributed to hundreds of experiments in biology, biotechnology, physical science and Earth science, welcomed several cargo spacecraft delivering tons of supplies and research experiments, and conducted a combined six spacewalks to perform maintenance and upgrades to the station. Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls #nasa #space #spacestation #astro2fish #landing #soyuz #internationalspacestation #astronomy #picoftheday

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    Snowy dunes on Mars. Over the winter, snow and ice cover Martian dunes… and unlike on Earth, this snow and ice is carbon dioxide… a.k.a. dry ice. When the Sun starts shining on it in the spring, the ice on the smooth surface of the dunes cracks and escaping gas carries dark sand out from the dune below, often creating beautiful patterns. On the rough surface between the dunes, frost is trapped behind small sheltered ridges. Seen by our Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, this image was taken over the Northern hemisphere of the Red Planet. Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona #nasa #space #mars #mro #marsorbiter #orbiter #redplanet #planet #solarsystem #exploration #science #picoftheday

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    After launching on Monday from Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Dragon has journeyed to the International Space Station (@iss). It arrives to the space station Wednesday, Aug. 16. Astronaut Jack Fischer (@astro2fish) shared this image of the robotic arm on space station saying "The arm is out and ready to capture a @SpaceX Dragon by the tail. Can’t wait to get to work on 2 tons of science!" The flight will deliver investigations and instruments that study cosmic ray particles, protein crystal growth, stem cell-mediated recellularization and a nanosateliite technology demonstration. The vehicle also will deliver supplies and equipment to crew members living aboard the station. In all, 6,400 pounds of experiments and supplies will arrive when Astronauts Jack Fischer of NASA and Paolo Nespoli of ESA (European Space Agency - @europeanspaceagency) use the station’s robotic arm to capture Dragon on Wednesday morning. Image credit: NASA/Jack Fischer #nasa #space #spacestation #earth #view #bluemarble #astro2fish #microgravity #research #science #spacex #internationalspacestation #research #cosmicrays #dragoncargocraft #parkinsonsdisease #technology #astronomy #picoftheday

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    A suborbital sounding rocket carrying multiple student experiments was successfully launched at 5:30 a.m. EDT, Thursday, June 22, from our Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. The mission carried experiments built by undergraduate students from universities and community colleges across the country through the RockOn! and RockSat-C programs. The experiments, launch on a 36-foot long Terrier-Improved Orion sounding rocket, flew to an altitude of 72 miles and landed, via parachute, in the Atlantic Ocean. The payload has been recovered and the students are expected to receive their experiments this afternoon to begin their data analysis. Credit: NASA #NASA #Rocket #Launch #RocketLaunch #StudentExperiment #Wallops #WFF #SoundingRocket

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    Two dozen scientists and members of our New Horizons spacecraft team ventured to Argentina and South Africa hoping to capture the fleeting starlit shadow of 2014 MU69 overnight on June 2-3, 2017 as MU69 passed in front of a distant star. MU69 is the target that the New Horizons spacecraft will explore in a flyby on New Year’s Day 2019. Swipe to see the teams in action in Argentina and South Africa as they collected data on the stellar occultation of MU69. It was reported that all 54 telescope teams collected data and that team scientists started digging into that data when they returned home after the observations. The main goal of these observations was to search for hazards to the spacecraft, while the teams also tried to glimpse the occultation of MU69 itself, in order to learn its precise size. Image 1 Credit: Kai Getrost Images 2 & 3 Credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI/Henry Throop #mu69occ #science #space #nasa #newhorizons #2014mu69 #mu69 #KuiperBeltObject #kbo #astronomy #nightsky #picoftheday

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    Astronaut Jack Fischer shared this picture of astronaut Peggy Whitson working during yesterday's spacewalk, saying "A spacewalk is like taking off the blinders to the enormous beauty of our world." Friday's 200th spacewalk in support of the International Space Station (@iss) officially lasted 4 hours and 13 minutes. During their time working outside station, astronauts Peggy Whitson and Jack Fischer were able to install a new avionics box that will supply electricity and data connections to science experiments. They also completed additional tasks to install a connector that will route data to the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, which detects and studies cosmic rays, as well as installed a protective shield on an external part of the station. Credits: NASA #nasa #space #astronaut #spacewalk #spacesuit #international #spacestation #nofilter #picoftheday #instadaily

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    [No Audio] Earth’s radiation belts, two doughnut-shaped regions of charged particles encircling our planet, were discovered more than 50 years ago, but their behavior is still not completely understood. Now, new observations from NASA’s Van Allen Probes mission show that the fastest, most energetic electrons in the inner radiation belt are not present as much of the time as previously thought. The results are presented in a paper in the Journal of Geophysical Research and show that there typically isn’t as much radiation in the inner belt as previously assumed — good news for spacecraft flying in the region. The 3-dimensional radiation belt model in the visualizations above was constructed by propagating electron flux measurements, corresponding to a given time and distance from Earth measured by the Van Allen Probes, along a 3-dimensional structure of magnetic dipole field lines. Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Tom Bridgman #nasa #space #vanallenbelt #sun #radiation #earth #nasabeyond #science

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    Stars were battling each other in a gravitational tussle, which ended with the system breaking apart and at least three stars being ejected in different directions. The speedy, wayward stars went unnoticed for hundreds of years until, over the past few decades, two of them were spotted in infrared and radio observations, which could penetrate the thick dust in the Orion Nebula. The observations showed that the two stars were traveling at high speeds in opposite directions from each other. The stars' origin, however, was a mystery. Astronomers traced both stars back 540 years to the same location and suggested they were part of a now-defunct multiple-star system. But the duo's combined energy, which is propelling them outward, didn't add up. The researchers reasoned there must be at least one other culprit that robbed energy from the stellar toss-up. Now Nthe Hubble Space Telescope has helped astronomers find the final piece of the puzzle by nabbing a third runaway star. The astronomers followed the path of the newly found star back to the same location where the two previously known stars were located 540 years ago. The trio reside in a small region of young stars called the Kleinmann-Low Nebula, near the center of the vast Orion Nebula complex, located 1,300 light-years away. The image by Hubble shows a grouping of young stars, called the Trapezium Cluster. Credits: NASA, ESA, K. Luhman (Penn State University), and M. Robberto (STScI) #nasa #space #nasabeyond #astronomy #hubble #science #stars #nebula

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    Not rocket science...but science on rockets! Three of our rockets carrying instruments into active auroras over Alaska to aid scientists studying the northern lights and the interactions of the solar wind with Earth's upper atmosphere and ionosphere were launched within a nearly two-hour period Thursday. Preliminary reports indicate that data was received from instruments aboard all three rockets. In this image, two of the sounding rockets are launched 90-seconds apart into an active aurora from the Poker Flat Research Range in Alaska. Credit: NASA/Terry Zaperach #nasa #space #aurora #nasabeyond #alaska #rocket #launch #science

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